Triplets?

edited December 2008 in General
I'm not understanding you're idea of triplets.

Let me start with a simple example. In 4/4 time I want a triplet on each beat of one measure. That means that I want to divide each beat in the measure into three beats. 1/32T can be used for this. For some reason, which I don't understand, beatmaker divides EACH of the beats in the measure into 4 groups of 3 beats. Now I can make beatmaker play a triplet by putting a note on the first, fifth, and ninth, steps of the measure but your allignment of veritical lines partitioning the measure into 4 groups of three steps isn't helping me at all. What's up with this? Shouldn't 1/32T give 3 groups of 4 steps?

I have a similiar problem with 1/64T.

Comments

  • edited 9:01PM
    I'm not understanding you're idea of triplets.

    Let me start with a simple example. In 4/4 time I want a triplet on each beat of one measure. That means that I want to divide each beat in the measure into three beats. 1/32T can be used for this. For some reason, which I don't understand, beatmaker divides EACH of the beats in the measure into 4 groups of 3 beats. Now I can make beatmaker play a triplet by putting a note on the first, fifth, and ninth, steps of the measure but your allignment of veritical lines partitioning the measure into 4 groups of three steps isn't helping me at all. What's up with this? Shouldn't 1/32T give 3 groups of 4 steps?

    I have a similiar problem with 1/64T.

    I think it makes sense the way it is. The lines are showing you the position of the 16th notes (there are 3 1/32T notes per 16th note). It looks strange if you are trying to write in 8th note triplets, because they are not uniformly positioned relative to the 16th notes. If you were writing in 32nd note triplets (which this scale is meant for) it would make perfect sense.

    If you just want 8th note triplets, put it in 1/16T mode and fill in every other note. I think it will make much more sense like that.
  • edited 9:01PM

    If you just want 8th note triplets, put it in 1/16T mode and fill in every other note. I think it will make much more sense like that.

    The problem I have with your suggestion is that no matter what duration of notes (1/8. 1/16. 1/32) you actually want to play there's a very good reason to use a higher step resolution. You need a higher step resolution so that you can play the notes a little off time so the loop doesn't sound like a drum machine. Or at least less like a drum machine than if you follow your suggestion.

    So in my case, even though I used a 1/32T step as an example because it was a bit easier to describe, I am really using 1/64T. Following your logic I think I would do that if I was using 1/64 Triplets. But how often do you really use 1/64 Triplets, or 1/32 Triplets, compared to how often 1/8 Triplets are used with a bit of ease in the timing here and there to make it sound more natural? It seems to me that how one answers that question determines what makes the most sense.
  • edited 9:01PM
    I don't think the step resolution is fixed for any pattern - underneath the hood it has enough resolution for any of these notes. You can use whatever step resolution you like to make it easy to edit, and go back and forth as you like. When you want to put down 8th note triplets, just put it in 1/16T mode and it will be very straightforward. Then go to whatever resolution you want for other notes.

    By the way, if you are using the finer resolution for slight timing variations, you can now use the groove editor which returned in 1.3.1. I think it's much better for that sort of thing. If you're using the timing for stutter, rolls or flams then you are already in the right place.
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